‘Harry & Meghan’ is narcissistic, self-pitying and full of Californian psychobabble | Given their hatred of the press, why are they doing this documentary?

Prince Harry and Meghan, Duke and Duchess of Sussex (Photo: AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey)
Prince Harry and Meghan, Duke and Duchess of Sussex (Photo: AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey)

Given their hatred of the press, why are they doing this documentary?

Source: ‘Harry & Meghan’ is narcissistic, self-pitying and full of Californian psychobabble

Opinion By Harry Mount

Nurse! Come quick! We’ve got a severe case of double narcissism!

Has there ever been a series of such relentless self-promotion? In nearly three hours on Netflix (with another three to come next Thursday), the Sussexes paint themselves as semi-divine, drenched in self-pity and virtue-signalling.

From the outset, the Royal Family are cast as the Dark Force. The opening credits of Harry & Meghan say “The Royal Family declined to comment.” In fact, the palace say they weren’t even consulted.

Prince Harry says he left the royal fold because he was “concerned with the safety of my family”. But only his immediate family – his wife and two children. He’s seems perfectly happy to lay into the wider family.

Rather than a reference to being brought up by his father after his mother’s death, he says, “A group of friends [in Africa] brought me up.” The Royal Family is racist, he implies, with one of his Californian psychobabble phrases: “In this family, you’re sometimes part of the problem, rather than the solution.”

He blasts the men in the Royal Family (and, by extension, their wives) for yielding to the “temptation to marry someone who fits the mould, as opposed to someone you’re destined to be with”. It’s head or heart, says Harry. He, naturally, is all heart.

The praise for Meghan is nuclear. We get a soft tinkling piano soundtrack for her childhood pictures. Her mother says she was a “very empathic child, very mature – I couldn’t help with her homework. She’s much smarter”.

On a trip back to her primary school, her headmistress, Miss Debbie, is overwhelmed, as if she’s seen a living goddess. If all that isn’t enough, Meghan reminds us that, as a child, she was “the smart one”.

A smart one who’s good at wreaking vengeance. Everyone’s in her crosshairs – her lying father and deceitful half-sister, as well as the wicked Royal Family for expecting her to learn the national anthem, curtsey to the Queen and work out what a walkabout is.

If the Sussexes weren’t famous or royal, no one would be interested in their banal, clichéd comments, plucked from Mills & Boon. At one point, Harry declares, “The craziest thing is this love story is only just getting started.”

We even get to see the staggeringly dull text messages of their early courtship: “You’re on!”; “Anything goes – I’m in the mood.”

They remain goofy teenagers. Harry fell for her when he saw her wearing dog ears on Snapchat. She fell for his Instagram feed of elephants and rhinos. At their engagement party, they dressed up in penguin onesies. And yet these are the two people who lecture to us about international politics!

Your heart occasionally goes out to Harry – for the loss of his beloved mother and his terrible treatment by the press as a boy. But then Harry and Meghan swiftly dissolve sympathy with their one-sided attack on the press.

They pick the newspaper headlines that were rude about Meghan marrying into the Royal Family. And then they pick the worst social media comments from the nastiest trolls. But they’re perfectly happy to take extracts from the Panorama interview with Princess Diana that Prince William never wanted to be broadcast again after the Martin Bashir scandal. More @ Source.

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